Updated 03/19/2022

The Model TT Truck
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia, by Bob Ross

The Ford Model TT is a truck made by Ford. It was based on the Ford Model T, but with a longer wheelbase, and a heavier frame and rear axle, giving it a rating of 1 short ton (0.91 t).

Production
When the first three units were produced in 1917, the Model TT was sold as a chassis with the buyer supplying a body. The price was $600. Starting in 1924, the truck was available with a factory-produced body. By 1926 the price had dropped to $325. In 1925, a hand-operated windshield wiper was added.

Military Production
In his World Encyclopedia of Military Vehicles, author Pat Ware writes that: “During World War I, the Model T was .. standardized in the “light” class. The first truck, using a long-wheelbase chassis designated Model TT, was launched in 1917. Although Ford was a pacifist, he was happy to supply the US Army with more than 12,000 of these vehicles,” and “there was no civilian production of the Model Ts between 1917 and 1918.”


Further on, Ware writes: “The Model T was widely used by the US and British armies during World War I as a staff car, ambulance, van and cargo truck, even as an artillery tractor, for which application the truck was fitted with twinned rear tires.” Many remained in service into the 1930s.

Below are the numbers of Model T trucks produced each year, not including Canadian production.
1917 – 3; 1918 – 41,105; 1919 – 70,816; 1920 – 53,787; 1921 – 64,796; 1922 – 154,039; 1923 – 246,817; 1924 – 259,118; 1925 – 306,434; 1926 – 213,914; 1927 – 74,335.

The rear axle of the TT has a worm drive and crown wheel, unlike the Model T’s crown wheel and pinion. The worm is located at the end of the drive shaft and above the crown wheel. The wheelbase of the Model TT is 125 inches (3,175 mm), compared to 100 inches (2,540 mm) for the Model T. It was often equipped with an accessory gearbox, such as the Ruckstell or Jumbo gearboxes, which allow the truck to have intermediate gears between low and high, useful for hill climbing.

The Model TT was very durable for the time, but slow when compared to other trucks. With standard gearing, a speed of not more than 15 mph was recommended, and with special gearing, a speed of not more than 22 mph was recommended. Standard worm gear ratio is 7.25:1, and special gearing gives a ratio of 5.17:1. Because of this, accessory catalogs offered items to help give the Model TT more power.
It was replaced by the Ford Model AA truck in 1928.

Tech Session at Alex Gillman’s Oma’s House
by Tom Romberg and Jim Ferguson
photos by Joe Pinnelli

On February 19 the club had what the Model A Club calls a Restoration Clinic at Alex’s Oma’s house. She had coffee and pastries and Alex has his ’21 Center Door in her garage. Bob Ross was instrumental in suggesting the clinic but wasn’t able to attend. It was fun to see and somewhat daunting to see lots of parts in boxes, a new shipment of parts, and all the rest of the project up close.

The focus of the clinic turned quickly to the engine which had obviously been cleaned, planed, and had a crank with bearing caps loosely in place.

Looking at Alex’s engine and rotating assembly, Tom checked the crank journals with a micrometer and cylinder walls with a gage and the consensus was crank, cylinders, babbitts, and pistons were all serviceable. Referring to the “Model T Ford Service” book “Taking up main bearings” and with a new shim pack we started.

We set the shims, draw cap nut down tightly lining up with cotter pin hole. Test tightness by turning engine over slowly to feel resistance. Back then no dimensional clearance or torque specs were given it was all by feel.

We had modern help with plastigauge and torque wrench to set thrust and bearing clearance.

Club attendants were Tom, Jim, Randy with a guest, Pat, George, Joe, Al, Richard and Alex with his father.


Some Photos of the Tech Session

Alex’s 1921 Center Door Model T


The Model T Engine
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Ok, here’s the deal, the Smithsonian Museum of History, it has many names, America’s Attic being one, has a magazine called of all things, the Smithsonian. The magazine decided to try to find the 101 most influential items out of its 137 million objects. That’s MILLION, with a “M”. Some of these items include little things like the American buffalo, the passenger pigeon, John Deere’s steel turning plow, Lewis & Clarks compass, Lincoln’s stove top hat, the Wright flyer, the Spirit of St. Louis and somewhere in the back, is the Model T Ford.

The Ford Model T used a 177 cu in (2.9 L) side valve, reverse-flow cylinder head inline 4-cylinder engine. It was primarily a gasoline engine. It produced 20 hp (14.9 kW) for a top speed of 45 mph (72 km/h). It was built in-unit with the Model T’s novel transmission (a planetary design), sharing the same lubricating oil.

The T engine was known for its simplicity, reliability, and economy. The engine remained in production for many years, and millions of units were produced. The engine design’s lifespan exceeded that of the Model T vehicle itself, with industrial, marine, and military applications extending its production run from 1908 to 1941. The T engine is on the Ward’s 10 Best Engines of the 20th Century list.
The T engine was produced continuously from September 27, 1908, through August 4, 1941, exactly 12,000 days. This makes it one of the longest engines in series production, especially considering that the specifications remained mostly unchanged for this entire duration. Its production run for the U.S. consumer market for passenger cars and pickups was shorter, being the 19 years’ production run of the Model T itself for that market (1908 to 1927). But the engine continued to be produced and sold to various consumer, industrial, military, and marine markets throughout the world until 1941.


The Model T engine was built as a gasoline engine. While not engineered specifically for multifuel ability, its simple, robust design allowed it to successfully run on a variety of combustible fuels including benzene, ethanol, or, with various available after-market attachments, kerosene. According to Ford Motor Company, the Model T had fuel economy on the order of 13–21 mpg-US
The T engine was an inline-four, with all four cylinders cast into one engine block. Such monobloc design was an uncommon practice when T production started in 1908. It lent itself to mass production, showing the Ford company’s prescient focus on design for manufacturability. The head, however, was detachable, which not only aided Ford in manufacturing but also made valve jobs (cleaning, grinding, or replacement of the poppet valves) easier. The block and head were both of cast iron.

Engine Specs
The engine’s bore was 3+3⁄4 inches (95.25 mm) and its stroke was 4 inches (101.6 mm) even, for a total displacement of 177 cu in (2.9 L). The compression ratio was 3.98 for most engines; early engines were slightly greater. This value is low by modern standards but was typical for the era, making the engine forgiving of poor-quality, low-octane fuel and minimizing cranking effort at starting.
The valvetrain was a side valve (flathead) design.
The crankshaft had 3 main bearings.
To be continued in the next newsletter.

THE SMITHSONIAN est. 1846

Ok, here’s the deal, the Smithsonian Museum of History, it has many names, America’s Attic being one, has a magazine called of all things, the Smithsonian. The magazine decided to try to find the 101 most influential items out of its 137 million objects. That’s MILLION, with a “M”. Some of these items include little things like the American buffalo, the passenger pigeon, John Deere’s steel turning plow, Lewis & Clarks compass, Lincoln’s stove top hat, the Wright flyer, the Spirit of St. Louis and somewhere in the back, is the Model T Ford.

This item was noted as; An automobile for the masses that put America in the driver’s seat. The first Ford Model T rolled out of a Detroit auto plant on October 1, 1908. Before long Henry Ford’s mass production technology would make cars more and more affordable. Prices fell from $850 in 1908 to $280 by 1925. The 1913 “touring” edition could reach speeds of 45 miles per hour with gas mileage of 13 to 24 miles per gallon. “I loved the car more than any I have ever had.” John Steinbeck said of the model T. “It understood me!”


BAND CHATTER
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